Re: Portraiture as a Site of Many Meetings

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The following is excerpted from the Afterword(s) to Portraits and Conversations, my recent collection of fictional essays:

One thing that I find interesting about portraits as a genre of painting is that they are most often considered to be a unique combination of an objective documentation of an individual and the painter’s subjective description of the same individual; another unique attribute of many portraits is that they are assumed to serve as representations of both the physical and psychological characteristics of the individual being portrayed.  The extent to which a specific portrait is interpreted by a viewer to be primarily an objective or subjective description varies depending on a number of factors: the context in which the portrait is presented, the biographies of the artist and sitter, the media selected for the portrait, and the artist’s use of that media.  Whether photographic portraits exist in the same way is open to question since the photograph is usually perceived to have a different relationship to objects and their potentially objective representation than a drawing or painting or verbal description.  Conversations are likewise a unique meeting place of subjective and objective interpretations.  The perspective from which one hears, or overhears, a conversation affects the meanings of the verbal statements in a variety of ways.  “To say nothing of her” is, for instance, an utterance that can be interpreted differently depending on how, why, and in what context it is received.  

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